TEVAS

Opening Ceremony Fashion Tevas
Opening Ceremony Fashion Tevas

High heels have been linked to many long-term health problems, including but not limited to unnatural toe bending, injured leg muscles, osteoarthritis of the knee, plantar fasciitis, lower back pain, and sciatica. Enter the “new” sandals trend. In reality, sandals are nowhere near new. Sandals are the oldest known footwear of any kind. This is probably because they don’t require too much material and can be made from rubber, leather, wool, tatami, or rope. Tevas are one of the types of sandals that have especially taken off this spring and summer.

When Tevas were originally created, they were just velcro watch straps attached to a flip flops. Made with an adventurous, travel-hungry spirit in mind, the original version of these sporty sandals look much the same, but now include a contoured EVA topsole and a durable rubber outsole. Teva officially earned its “in” cred when the company announced a collaboration with Opening Ceremony (which were not stocked in AP's size in Tokyo!), featuring metallics, patterned neon, and neoprene sandals. There has been a lot of push back from certain parts of the fashion community, however, because the sandals are so far from the aesthetics of previous trends and are considered to be purely geared towards comfort. Leeann Duggan from Refinery29 put it best in her article, “Crunchy Footwear is Happening, Whether We Like It or Not.” In the article, she wrote that “To me, despite minor OC flourishes and slightly less-frowsy colorways like silver and gold, these things are all function, no flash. They still look like the shoe most likely to be worn by a man in a fisherman sweater with leaves in his beard.” Although I am 100% behind comfy sandals and flatter shoes like Birkenstocks or these Givenchy calf hair slip on sneakers, I am still hesitant to embrace Tevas. Perhaps I should start with their classier looking leather items before fully committing to the outdoorsy style of Tevas.
-Anna Choi